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Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
cuts should be extended and for whom. taxation is not an economic science. it definitely -- if you gather 10 people in a room, you're going to get 10 different opinions and the views on taxing -- on the merits and philosophy of taxing individual asks the rich will vary. but, you know, this sort of immediate problem is not necessarily the larger philosophical question. it really is the more practical question of what is our tax system going to look like. host: and we've got this lead editorial from this morning's "wall street journal." real housewife offense the beltway. they write -- host: back to the phones. don in oklahoma city on our line for democrats. go ahead, don. caller: good morning. i have a couple of quick comments i would like to make. the first is that i find it ironic for so many years in recent history republicans have claimed to own patriotism yet they don't seem to want to vacate their fair share. host: joseph rosenberg. guest: you know, i mean, i'm not sure, you know, i'm not sure this is about pay. -- patriotism or anything like that. you know, the question of wh
piece looking at the world will be like in 150 years in the role of science and technology will play in our future. thanks so much for being with us from new york city today. guest: thanks for having me. happy new year. host: why look into the future? guest: you know, the world as we know, the world did not end on december 21st. so, i think this is really good time to look -- we've been all sort of focused on that date, not all of us, some of us. this is a good time to look into the future. we have a very popular department that we do every month called 50 and 100 and 150 years ago. this is where we go back into the archives of scientific american and we pick out things that people were writing and a lot of things people were writing were predictions about what the future would bring. we thought that we would turn it on its head and actually just do a whole package of articles in our january issue which is out on newsstands now. it looks at what could happen scientifically, technologically in the next 50, 100 and 150 years. host: you look at things like drone. also nuclear issues
. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the old year ticked down today, and with it went any hope of meeting the midnight "fiscal cliff" deadline. house republicans opted not to hold any votes on the issue tonight. so-- officially, at least-- more than $600 million in tax hikes and spending cuts begin taking effect tomorrow. in the meantime, senate republicans and the white house continue working on a possible deal. . >> are running out of time. americans are still threatened with a tax hike in just a few hours. >> new year's eve morning at the capitol began with a warning from senate majority leader harry reid. after a long weekend dush -- weekend of tense negotiations vice president joe biden had spent sunday dealing directly with the sena
earth science and technology will send a ship to an area near an island about 2,000 kilometers southeast of tokyo. the ocean there is more than 5,000 meters deep. the researchers plan to extract samples of mud by sinking a pipe 20 meters into the seabed, then they will analyze the types, densities and locations of rare earth metals. a group from the university of tokyo found high concentrations of metals in the area last june. they estimated the deposit could satisfy japan's needs for those materials for more than 200 years. analysts at the u.s. geological survey say china currently accounts for 97% of global output of the metals. >>> fresh or frozen? gourmets say that's what separates fine dining experience from a soggy tv meal. now, a small japanese company is ready to send the question itself the way of the ice age. >> reporter: this high-end sushi restaurant in tokyo serves extremely good tuna. it's frozen, but you'd never guess. these are the advanced freezers which preserve the fish's freshness. the secret is magnetic wave he is. food is kept constantly vibrating so that ice crysta
first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. the red cross was down here all the time. [ man ] they've given us a lot of heart. in times of need, they're there. ♪ [ kerry ] my dad was watching his house burn. he turned around, and all of a sudden, there was this guy standing there from the red cross. at a point where i had just lost everything, the idea that there was someone there... that's an amazing thing. ♪ temerity, temer . >>> the rising political star of 2013, chris hayes, who will that be? >> massachusetts senator elizabeth warren, i think it is not an easy thing to do what she did. you know, she was a star on this network and among progressives, but to go on particularly in massachusetts, i think she will be absolutely a force in massachusetts. >> it pains me to say it, but this is going to be the year when corey booker, he is either going to run for governor -- >> krystal, the rising star. >> the youngest woman in the house, also the first hindu-american woman in congress, combat veteran, really an amazing woman.
there are social sciences out there and scientists who say this is true. now, increasingly, these educational benefits, which, you know, make only marginal improvements to education access, they are disputed. you know, it is increasingly disputed that their are any educational benefits. but i think it is also important for the court to bear in mind, and i think the court's jurisprudence is moving this way. even if there are some educational benefits, they have to be weighed against the cost that are inherent in engaging in this discrimination. something is compelling. and you have to consider the inherent liabilities and racial discrimination that involves as well. well, what are some of the costs of racial discrimination? well, i should know this by heart, but i do not. i post on comment sections on websites often. here it is. the cost of racial discrimination in admissions. it is personally unfair. it passes over better qualified students. disturbing legal and moral precedent and allowing racial discrimination. it creates resentment. it stigmatizes the so-called beneficiaries in the eyes of
't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> joining me now is daiftd web and jason riley this, is predictable as election season comes and goes. going back to 1998, missouri, democratic party radio ad. elect republicans black churches are going burn. al gore goes for a black audience goes into preacher mode. rbi republicans don't want to count new the census. hillary clinton changes her cadence. it's predictable. they did it this election season y do they keep doing it? >> because it work autos well... i think it does work. to some extent. >> the left likes to complain but you listen to rhetoric and think that is the last thing in the world they want. take the situation we just have gone through. here, you had the nation's first black president just reelected trying to nominate the third black un ambassador to become the third black secretary of state. this would be considered fro pro gres. -- pro grechls but no. instead left -- . >> she's a woman, it's about race. >> right reduced to being a black woman instead of credentials she used to get the job. so we know the
and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. with odor free aspercreme. powerful medicine relieves pain fast, with no odor. so all you notice is relief. aspercreme. >>> two monumental shifts in american culture in 2012, two states voting to legalize marijuana and same-sex marriage is legal in nine states and the district of columbia. president obama tipped the scales with the stunning announcement he now supports same-sex marriage. >> how much of it is personal, how much is political? is this a game changer? just yesterday clay aiken said he wished president obama would, quote, hurry up. you must be pretty happy that he reacted so quickly. >> i am. i feel so empowered. >> i mean, a big day, you know, every gay american, a big day for every american in america, whatever reaction you had to it. how did you feel when you heard the news? >> you know, it is a little bittersweet. i'm in north carolina and as a north carolinian, i was really disappointed with the way the amendment initiative vote went yesterday here in nort
the most aboard climate science is going on. these are the most destructive fires in colorado history and they come after the warmest weather ever recorded. you could do the same exercise all over the planet. this is what it looks like as the planet begins -- and i underline begins -- to warm pita mohamed mursi had been declared the winner in each presidential race. >> we will respect agreements and international law as well as egyptian commitments and treaties with the rest of the world. >> to talk about the significance of election, we are joined by sharif of del produce. >> the first democratically elected in egypt's history. his win marks a victory over the lingering remnants of mubarak's regime. >> chief justice john roberts prove to be the surprise deciding vote. joining with the court's liberal members. >> the highest court in the land has not spoken. we will continue to implement this law and we will work together to improve on where we can. >> me state the positive first. this really is a huge victory for our side. in spite of all of my concerns with this law, it did not go f
. this summer, he showed us the science behind every shape, size, and shade of these pixels. >> you now have your camouflage. so we're trying to trick the brainseeing things that aren't actually there. >> reporter: digital shapes creates depth and shadows where none exist. that's today's design. >> what's coming up down the road and very quickly is the harry potter cloak. >> what is that? >> reporter: with that fictional cloak, harry isn't just camouflaged, he's invisible. >> my body's gone! >> how invisible are we talking here? if i walked into a room with a soldier wearing one of these cloaks -- >> you wouldn't see him at all. he would be completely invisible to you. >> reporter: this isn't make-believe. the military has seen this so-called quantum stealth technology. it works by bending the light around an object, even concealing most of a person's shadow. imagine what that could do for a sniper, hiding in a field, or the american pilots who ejected over libya when their fighter jets crashed last year. >> they could actually pull out, very similar to what they carry with a survival blanke
of the arts in favor of science, in favor of technology but it strikes me that what you just said and the context of the book and the fact that we still have the sort of need for the untold stories for the dark secrets is indicative of a kind of historical illiteracilliterac y that exists in our country and that african-americans and that black history in africana history itself with the subject that is most unknown or he raced from our collective consciousness. do you think that historical illiteracy contributes to our present and even to our future? do you see the larger story that you tell here as essential to your vision of the country we ought to live in? >> i don't know that i have thought about it in that way. what i definitely thought about was how reflective her family was of the american story and i wanted very much to imbue it with the history so that people could see that her family had front row seats to some of the most important moments in our history slavery, civil war emancipation, the migration, jim crow, the depression and that all their steps forward and steps
chair, had a governmental studies program, got his ba in political science from university of florida in this animated phd from the university of michigan. so he speaks for the heartland of our great country. >> any cd automobile industry. [laughter] >> and was opposed by stopping production of the units sold. the electors are solid in all and is on every show known to humankind. they've often competed for the most quotations in any given year than all of our media. norm is a resident scholar at the representative for public policy research. the election analyst for cbs and has written for every publication on the face of the earth dirty and tom both have been on the news hour with jim lehrer, "nightline," charlie rose. he has another heartland are, ba university of minnesota phd from the university of michigan, which is where you guys met. i just have to say that one of the reasons why i think that tom and norm for so much attention is because they have been spending their entire lives being so moderate and reasonable that when they get mad, they really must be something wrong. so wh
, and how the landscape might look for 2013. we have a political science professor, and danny vargas, president and ceo of the communications and marketing firm. welcome to "viewpoint," to you all. >> happy new year. >> i want to take a big picture look back at 2012, and go around and ask each of you what 2012 would be remembered for? >> my background is in politics, so i would have to go with the presidential election, barack obama being re-elected not withstanding some significant economic concerns going into the beginning of 2012, or a year ago at the end of 2011, it was clear the president would have an uphill battle. and three things struck me as interesting. super packs, the billions raised to reshape voter thinking, and particularly senate and house races, you saw a real impact -- >> in our region. >> absolutely in our region. and that was the first thing that struck me, and the second was turnout. i was among those that believed the president would get 95 or 96% of the african-american vote, and it turned out to be the same. and the same with young voters. and nobody expected
's our representative of the disinvestment of humanity, arts in favor of commerce, science, technolog y. but what you just said and the context within need for the untold stories is indicative of the historical literacy that's black history is the subject that is most of known or erased from our collective consciousness. is that where literacy contributes to our future? the larger story is essential to your vision of the country we ought to live then. >> guest: i don't know. i thought about how reflective her family was of the american story. i wanted to to imbue with a history so people could see her family had front-row seats to the most important moments. slavery, a civil war, and emancipation, migration, jim crow, a depression, and all the steps forward and back were reflected of who we are. >> host: did you think of it as a smaller project? not to put it in context the individuals of the family tree but it became a social history of rural and urban urban, a southern and northern sweeping, intimate. did that scale have been as a result of their research with pen to paper and fought
because, of course, this is science hour, of course, but i was just reading up on this, but, you know, in rats, even in dogs and other animals, the calorie-restricted diets do increase the life span by one-third. they did a study on primates. it doesn't seem to actually translate to primates. therefore, people are assuming it doesn't translate to humans. >> just read this story because you want to have it in context. it does not mean you eat bgarbae that's out there. >> obviously you have to eat right. the book you're writing, there's some people that actually eat well are never hungry. maybe slightly overweight, but they eat healthy. those people are fine. >> yeah. and that's a hard diet to accomplish in the food environment that we live in, which is what i'm writing about. >> not if you wrap it all with bacon which is what i do. >> you have a resolution. >> what is the resolution? >> he's going to lose weight. he's going to get in really good shape. >> i think i'm looking pretty good right now. >> right. >> you look slightly overweight. >> i'm doing all right. >>> with us now, chief
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)

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